What is the Soil Secrets Protocol?
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What is the Soil Secrets Protocol?

  1. TerraPro, the Carbon Matrix.  Is a black granular product that needs to be placed on the surface around the plant or transplant. TerraPro is sold in small homeowner bags or by the ton and you will need the whole ton to plant 2000 plants. 
  1. EndoMaxima, is a mycorrhizal fungi that helps plants uptake water and minerals from the soil.  It also protects plant roots from disease and from harmful parasitic nematodes.   While the best time to use EndoMaxima is while planting the seed before sowing, you can also dust the product onto the roots of your transplants. I use a spice or salt shaker to shake the dust onto the roots before planting.  One pound should be enough to do 2000 plants if you’re generous with the product.  
  1. Consortium BIOpack, is a blend of 20 species of beneficial soil bacteria, called a soil probiotic.  This product is 100 percent soluble in water.   It comes in a 50 gram packet, enough to treat one full acre.  Mix one pack with about 10 gallons of water and disperse the 10 gallons around each new transplant using a pump sprayer.  One pack with 10 gallons of water will treat an acre worth of transplants.  You need to spray the soil around the plant covering the same 1 foot radius you treated with the TerraPro Carbon Matrix, wetting the soil until its dripping wet. 
  1. Protein Crumblies, is food for the microbes, providing the amino acids that the microbes need to grow more microbes.  Apply one full handful of the granular protein onto the surface, placing the protein around the transplants.   Protein also provides all the Nitrogen needed to grow the crop, so don’t apply other sources of Nitrogen. 
With and Without the Soil Secrets Protocol
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With and Without the Soil Secrets Protocol

The close up of seed was done in our lab where we treated some of the seed with our EndoMaxima mycorrhizal spores and did not treat some.  

The seed was planted in clear plastic books so we could see the roots and the fungal growth on the roots.  The seed that’s germinating was at day 3 while the non treated seed at day three is not showing the same amount of germination.  

This is a mycorrhizal only test.  

The wheat fields showing two fields comparing is with Ag Grade TerraPro and EndoMaxima being used on the treated field.  

The image showing roots was taken with our soil camera and the image with lots of roots also shows the mycorrhizal roots as tiny hairs crossing over to the bigger plant hair roots.  

The image with only one root and without all the roots was the book not treated with EndoMaxima.  Both images were taken at the same soil depth and timeline.

Using EndoMaxima
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Using EndoMaxima

 The Endo type mycorrhizal fungi, also known as VAM for Vesicular Arbuscular Mycorrhizae are a category of mycorrhiza that associate with the majority of plants on Earth.  

They are generalists which means that any species of Endo can associate with any plant species with only modest differences in who favors who.  

The spores of the Endo type mycorrhizae are huge in comparison to the Ecto type and are not airborne like the Ecto’s.  Being so large they also do not move easily through the soil, since the soil’s porosity is smaller than the spores, therefore putting them on the surface does not work very well.  

The way to use them is to dust the seed before planting or dust the roots of transplants before planting.  The spores need to be in direct contact with the seed or the root of the potential host plant. 

 Again, dusting the spores dry onto the seed or the roots is the best way to use a mycorrhizal product.  

MYCORRHIZAL PLANT ASSOCIATIONS
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MYCORRHIZAL PLANT ASSOCIATIONS

EndoMaxima and EndoMaxima Advanced 

contain arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus sometimes called Endo or VAM or AMF.   

Some commercially important plant groups that benefit from arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus  

Acacia 

Carrisa 

Fountain Grass 

Agapanthus  

Carrot  

Fushia  

Alder  

Cassara  

Gardenia  

Almond  

Ceanothus  

Garlic  

Apple  

Cedar  

Geranium  

Apricot  

Celery  

Grape- raisin  

Arauceria  

Cherry  

Grape- table  

Artichoke  

Chinese Tallow  

Grape- wine  

Ash  

Chrysanthemum  

Green Ash  

Asparagus  

Citrus, all  

Guayule  

Avocado  

Clover  

Hibiscus  

Bamboo  

Coconut  

Holly  

Banana  

Coffee  

Impatiens  

Barley  

Coral Tree  

Jojoba  

Bayberry  

Corn  

Juniper  

Bean  

Cotton  

Kiwi  

Beech  

Cottonwood  

Leek  

Begonia  

Cowpea  

Lettuce  

Black Cherry  

Crab Tree  

Ligustrum  

Blackberry  

Creosote Bush  

Magnolia  

Black Locust  

Cucumber  

Mahonia  

Blue Gramma  

Currant  

Maiden Grass  

Box Elder  

Cypress  

Mango  

Boxwood  

Dodwood  

Maples, all  

Brazilian Rubber  

Eggplant  

Marigold  

Mountian Laurel  

Pecan  

Sourwood  

Nasturium  

Pepper  

Soybean  

Okra  

Pistachio  

Spengeri Fern  

Olive  

Pittosporum  

Squash  

Olive Palm  

Plum  

Strawberry  

Onion  

Podocarpus  

Sudan Grass  

Pacific Yew  

Poinsetta  

Sugar Cane  

Palms, all  

Potato  

Sumac  

Pampas Grass  

Rephiolepis  

Sunflower  

Passion Fruit  

Raspberry  

Sweet Gum  

Papaya  

Redwood  

Sweet Potato  

Paw Paw  

Saltbrush  

Sycamore  

Peach  

Sequoia  

Taxus  

Peanut  

Snapdragon  

Tea  

Tobacco  

Tomato  

Wheat  

Yam  

Yucca  

 

Bulbs, all  Euonymus  Mesquile  
Burning Bush  Fern  Millet  
Cacao  Fescus  Mimosa  
Cactus  Fig  Mondo Grass  
Camellia  Forsythia  Morning Glory  
Rice  Russian Olive  Ryegrass  
Rose  Sagebrush   

Some commercially important plant groups that benefit from ECTO-mycorrhizae.  MycoMaxima by Soil Secrets contains species of ECTO  

Arctostaphylos  Fir  Pine  
Birch  Hemlock  Popular  
Douglas-fir  Larch  Spruce  
Eucalyptus  Oak/Beech  Walnut  

 

Over 90% of the world’s plant species form mycorrhizae and require the association for maximum performance in the field. These lists are by no means, complete. 

Pecan Associations with Mycorrhizae
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Pecan Associations with Mycorrhizae

It could be true if you were in a riparian area of Texas where Pecan grow naturally that the specific species of Ecto Mycorrhizae could be air born and therefore capable of inoculating a tree.   However I’ve personally seen orchards in that region of Texas that did not have a mycorrhizal infection and suffered nutrient update inhibition.  Once we inoculated the trees with the proper species of mycorrhizal fungi the trees rapidly begin to benefit from the infection.   In working with a company in Mexico that has the majority market share in agriculture for the distribution of fertilizers and biomimetic materials such as mycorrhizal products, we’ve seen the same thing.   


I recall a conversation with a pecan grower in Texas about 15 years ago while I was attending the Texas Organic Farming conference, where the grower noticed that trees across the road from his orchard growing in the nearby river flood plain did not show zinc nutrient inhibition.   He was curious why his trees had this problem while the wild trees across the road did not.   I theorized that his trees lacked the mycorrhizal relationship  so we treated his trees and solved the problem.   Therefore I don’t put much stock in the academic world when they challenge this concept as they simply don’t have the years of experience or access to the science that I’ve had.     
 
The images below show pecan roots with the fruiting body of mycorrhizal fungi and the mycelium in soil showing up after the trees are treated that are now showing up in an orchard that we inoculated only months earlier.   Already the trees are showing improvement in nutrient uptake, no zinc deficiency in tissue tests and no outward symptoms of zinc uptake inhibition.    In fields within a stones throw we are not seeing the same thing on the same farm.  These images came from an organic pecan farm here in New Mexico taken a few weeks ago.    You are welcome to share these, just give me credit for where they came from.  
 
Michael Melendrez
Director, Soil Secrets LLC

 

 

Soil Changes caused by TerraPro's Carbon Matrix
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Soil Changes caused by TerraPro's Carbon Matrix

Since 2004 we’ve been monitoring a site in Northern Arizona’s desert where our Carbon Matrix of TerraPro along with our EndoMaxima mycorrhizal product has been used. The Consortium BIOpack has not been part of this test since we had not yet developed it in 2004. I’ve attached a soil test done from samples collected in the fall of 2016. Check out the changes. The attached test shows the Control, which is the original soil before Soil Secrets plus the trial site. The one thing I don’t agree with is the soil pH as I have other soil tests done by the same lab that show the original pH at 8.6 with the Trial site soil pH dropping to 7.4. Knowing the geology of the parent rock on this site I find that reading more likely.
Also, the Trial site % Soil Organic Matter of 5.8% is the average of the soil going down 18 inches deep. The control and the original soil had .6% soil organic matter. When I tested for the average going down 12 inches the % soil organic matter is 7.6%. We can all appreciate the benefit that soil carbon provides and every farmer, landscape designer, landscape contractor I’ve ever met is on the page, trying to increase the soil organic matter content using whatever means they have available. I think this huge change in % soil organic matter on this Soil Secrets trial site exemplifies the process of Soil Carbon Sequestration. Take a look at the pictures of the soil, before and after if you’d like to see them. It’s quite impressive for those of us into soil carbon and soil health.
What is Soil Secrets
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What is Soil Secrets

Growing any plant using Soil Secrets is going to yield success, a healthier plant, and a better yield. The reason is that Soil Secrets is using the “Inspiration of Nature in a Biomimetic Way.” In Nature, plants get all that they need using a Bio-Geo-Chemical process that has developed over hundreds of millions of years. For example, for every mineral or nutrient a plant needs, from nitrogen, phosphorus, iron, potassium, zinc, etc., there’s a bacteria or fungi that can deliver that nutrient to the plant. Minerals only get locked up in the soil pH system when the microbes are missing, but once we put those microbes back into the equation the problem is solved. The only limitation that remains is the question, does the soil contain the mineral that the plant needs? A sandy soil may not since it’s weak in electrical magnetic capacity to hold onto the minerals in which case it may need to be added. However, if we use the strong Paramagnetic Electrical Magnetism of the Carbon Matrix found in TerraPro we can fortify the sandy soil and fix that problem as well, therefore holding onto both water and minerals resulting in producing a “Nutrient Dense Food.”

We need to market Soil Secrets as the “Growers Secret to Success, Beyond Organic” because we can fix soil problems. The idea that Dave Hicks and I tried to develop a few years ago falls in line with the same concept. Grown with Soil Secrets campaign.